Original Birth Certificate, Please!

Most people have a birth certificate, and it shows their birthparents’ names. Proof of age is very important in so many circumstances. Our children were often required to give a copy of their birth certificate to sport teams, schools, and the DMV!

In adoption, birth certificates are an even bigger deal. When an adoption is legally finalized, the original birth certificate is replaced with a new one. In a closed adoption, like mine, my original birth certificate was sealed away in a vault—by law, it was sealed forever. The new, or amended, birth certificate had the names of my parents who adopted me, my mom and dad.

In my memoir, I reserve the names, mom and dad, for my parents. My birthparents are my birthmother and birthfather, or mother and father. So, at a glance, the reader knows who’s who!

Once I knew my birthmother’s name, I decided to ask for my original birth certificate. It was a tricky process, but thankfully, I succeeded. What a joy to hold that simple document, a lawful and legitimate record of my illegitimate birth!

When I showed it to my son, he said he was surprised it wasn’t framed and on display—he knew how important an original birth certificate was to me. It is the only record I have that includes my birthmother’s name, her signature, my name, and my date of birth. That is who I was until my parents took me home at eight months. In fact, legally, my first name was my name until my adoption was finalized. I was almost two years old. That’s a long time to have a different legal identity! 

Adopted at 8 months!

Leave a Reply



Ronald Parsons

1 year ago

Good stuff!!

bonnieparsons8472

1 year ago

Thanks so much!

Norma

1 year ago

I’m following your blog with great interest, Bonnie! You tell your story so naturally. And the palette you’ve chosen – with the cards, photos, and little sailboat – so enhances your words. What an adorable baby you were!

bonnieparsons8472

1 year ago

Dear Norma, There aren’t words to express my appreciation for your thoughtful and kind comment. Thank you for pulling it all together for me! xo

Judith Land

1 year ago

My birth and baptismal certificates were not the originals.

bonnieparsons8472

1 year ago

We have a human right to our identity records. Your ‘Adoption Detective, Memoir of an Adopted Child’ is one of my favorite adoption memoirs! I’m so glad you found my blog!

understandingisforgiving

1 year ago

Nice work in the tricky challenge of getting your original birth certificate. I love the baby picture of you looking around, trying to take it all in. I have only two pictures of myself in my baby years, and one of the pictures my look is similar but more pronounced “Who are these people?”

jacqelinewilson

1 year ago

I got my original birth certificate from 1966. There is a check box agreed the question, “Was this birth legitimate? Yes. No.” Mine had an X in the No box.

jacqelinewilson

1 year ago

*after

“there is no one like YOU”

You’re Here–Welcome!

My name is Bonnie. My parents adopted me when I was 8 months old. I’ve written a memoir about my life and the difficult search for my original identity. After 35 years, I have my answers!
I hope my story is an inspiration for you or someone you know who is searching for their birth parents and family ancestry.

Which came first–the chicken or the egg? Or in my case–the book or the blog?

Good question!  The book came first. My blog has the same name as the book. Each blog post tells you something about me. By nature, a memoir is personal. My persistence to find answers to my identity and write a memoir was a soul-searching, personal journey. It’s sad at times, but often fun and joyful.

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